---

---MENU   HOME

---

Images below are samples from each separate gallery on the site.

Scroll down, or use the MENU button above, to view the full galleries.

---       GALLERY

---MENU   People

---

---       GALLERY

---MENU   Street

---

---       GALLERY

---MENU   Other

---

---

---MENU   ABOUT

---

THERE ARE FACES I REMEMBER .......

 

I'm a non-commercial photographer, and much of my work is of personal interest only. However, I often take people photographs for charitable and other not-for-profit organisations in Northampton, to help with their promotion. People photography is in fact my over-riding interest because, apart from animals, it is only people that convey emotion, feelings, and spirit: for me, photography is about those things.

 

The photographs I take of people could be categorised simply as either in a studio, or, out of a studio.

 

The 'advantage' of studio shots is that the photographer is (theoretically) in control of all aspects of the shoot, including choice of model for the specific purpose (such as fashion, punk or goth, or tasteful nude).

My preference is very much for moody black & white, and, artistic images, and I admire work by (eg) Cecil Beaton, David Bailey, John Swannell, and Barry Lategan amongst others.

Unfortunately though, I've done little of this style of photography lately, so it doesn't feature prominently on this site.

 

Photographs I take out of a studio use whatever combination of elements (eg people, weather, locations) that are present at the time. They could be sub-grouped into headings such as environmental portraits, street photography, reportage, or even photojournalism, etc. The images that I include in the category could be taken anywhere that the subjects frequent, such as home, work, at leisure, whilst travelling, etc, etc, and they could be taken in the UK or elsewhere in the world.

Although many photographers would disagree with me, I'd say that the border between the non-studio groups is often so blurred as to be meaningless. To further upset the purists, I should also make clear that I do not accept that street photography must be candid: if the subject / object is in or is visible from a place frequented by the public, and the elements have not been set up for the purpose of the shot, that is street photography as far as I'm concerned (in one or more of its guises). So sorry to all you dogmatists and bigots, but my opinion is just as valid as yours!

 

In these categories, I admire work by (eg) Henri Cartier-Bresson, Brassai, Robert Doisneau, Willy Ronis, Don McCullin, and Steve McCurry amongst others. However, I also watch with envy the work of two rising stars: Chris Kingsford-Curram, &, Lee Welton.

 

....... IN MY LIFE, I'VE LOVED THEM ALL.

(with apologies to John Lennon & Paul McCartney).

---

---MENU   CONTACT

---

If you wish to contact me, please use the form below and I will get back to you asap.

Required fields are marked *
Please tick this box to prove that you are human *

---

---MENU   BLOGLIST

---

18 August 2019

People Power Passion etc at Luton

In keeping with my aim of photographing different things where possible this year, I decided to give Luton a try on 17 August. The initial inspiration was actually to visit an exhibition gallery, called the Departure Lounge, to see its current offering 'Back Catalogue'. However, the plan was to then ... read more ...

12 August 2019

Blisworth Canal Festival 2019

The 9th annual Blisworth Canal Festival took place on Saturday 10th & Sunday 11th August, and I visited on the Sunday. I've attended a couple of times before, but after a very unpleasant experience ... read more

30 July 2019

Birmingham, Sandwell & Westside Jazz Festival 2019

The 35th Birmingham, Sandwell and Westside Jazz Festival took place from Friday 19 until Sunday 28 July. There were around 200 gigs, mostly free, and featured some of the biggest names of the jazz genre, such as ... read more

Northampton County Beer Festival 2019

Posted on 9th June, 2019

The 2019 Northampton County Beer Festival was held at Becket's Park, between the River Nene and the town centre, from Friday 31st May until the Sunday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photos were taken on 1st June, and show Arran, Karnal, and Paul. They're my three partners in boozing crime, with each showing their unique brand of contempt, knowing that they were to make up this rogue's gallery.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The friends of Becket's Park (known as the Buddies of Becket's) have made amazing strides in the last two or three years to improve the place, with the result that an increasing number of outdoor events have made it their go-to venue. All credit to both the park and the event promoters.

 

Make A Comment

Characters left: 2000

Comments (0)

---

---MENU   BLOG011

---

18 August 2019

People Power Passion, at Luton

In keeping with my aim of photographing different things where possible this year, I decided to give Luton a try on 17 August. The initial inspiration was actually to visit an exhibition gallery, called the Departure Lounge, to see its current offering 'Back Catalogue'. However, the plan was to then take a few pics, to continue testing my legacy Sigma 400mm lens.

On walking from the bus interchange to the gallery however, I noticed lots of large pictorial posters stuck to walls. All the posters were drawing attention to an event called People Power Passion, which commemorates the Peace Day riot that took place in Luton in 1919. That riot began when a celebration of the end of war turned nasty because only the well-to-do were invited, rather than any of those who actually did the dirty work.

 

People Power Passion has six parts, spread over a number of months, and I was very lucky to be in Luton on the occasion of one of those, the Justice 39 event. The title is taken from the fact that 39 poor people were arrested at the riot, and their situations were brought to life in St George's Square on Saturday by 39 young performers. All individuals were very talented, making their case with strength and conviction: I just hope now that they were not just acting, but were sincere in terms of their idealistic hopes, and don't become disillusioned as they get older, by the evils of the real world.

 

The image shows one of those budding thespians, leading a tribute to one of those arrested at the riot.

Click here to return to the homepage. Click here to return to the bloglist.

 

Comment Form

If you wish to comment, please use the form below.

Comments are moderated before publication.

Required fields are marked *
Please tick this box to prove that you are human *

---

---MENU   BLOG010

---

12 August 2019

Blisworth Canal Festival 2019

The 9th annual Blisworth Canal Festival took place on Saturday 10th & Sunday 11th August, and I visited on the Sunday. I've attended a couple of times before, but after a very unpleasant experience in 2015, I decided to stay away from then on. On that occasion, an arrogant and obnoxious Australian sheep-shearer accused me of being about to steal a scrap of fleece he had just cut. I complained to the organisers about him, and I'd like to think they took notice, as he was thankfully not there on the Sunday. But of course, anything could have happened in those four years.

Anyway, I've been looking for different things to photograph this year, as the novelty of events such as St Patrick's Day, London Pride, Leicester Rathayatra etc, is waning a bit. So, it was another chance for Blisworth. Not that it was a cert when I left the house mind you, as I first went to a new destination (for me), Milton Malsor Motocross.

 

I was hoping to be at Milton Malsor MX for some time, but realised I was out of my depth re getting any decent shots. The main reason I'd like to think, is that I couldn't hold a legacy Sigma 400mm lens (ie 800mm on micro 4/3) steady. That caused more than the obvious problem of camera shake, as it also made it impossible to pre-focus on a fixed point. That meant I got 99%+ out-of-focus shots, as I missed the correct instant to release the shutter, even in burst mode. Even allowing for the problems though, the visit has whetted my appetite to try again, if and when there is another meet there.

 

Back to Blisworth, nothing much has changed: the canal-side section remains a typical mix of narrow boats, various types of side stall, other transport exhibits, and some entertainment. In its favour though is the fact that it's not purely canal-based, but takes place in several locations around the village. All locals seem to participate with enthusiasm in fact, making it genuinely a village-wide effort. It's not enough to make me want to rush back next year unfortunately, but it may be a fall-back. We'll see.

 

By the way, the photo was taken with the 400mm lens, from a distance of approx 30 metres, and with slight support from a tree trunk. That was probably the success of the day, proving that the lens is pretty good. It just needs a decent tog to use it now.

Click here to return to the homepage. Click here to return to the bloglist.

 

Comment Form

If you wish to comment, please use the form below.

Comments are moderated before publication.

Required fields are marked *
Please tick this box to prove that you are human *

---

---MENU   BLOG009

---

30 July 2019

Birmingham, Sandwell & Westside Jazz Festival 2019

The 35th Birmingham, Sandwell and Westside Jazz Festival took place from Friday 19 until Sunday 28 July. There were around 200 gigs, mostly free, and featured some of the biggest names of the jazz genre, such as Digby Fairweather and Val Wiseman. My own main jazz interest is 'trad', and with many different versions of the jazz genre available, I chose gigs sparingly.

Many venues were typical, such as pubs, restaurants and clubs. However, in making the festival as inclusive and accessible as possible, there were more unusual locations, such as libraries, a shopping centre, a retirement village, and, the one shown in the image, Lee Longlands high-class furniture store. That specific venue was much-appreciated by both the Tenement Jazz Band and the audience, with free champagne the icing on the cake.

 

Apart from the festival being a fantastic mostly-free offering of top-notch entertainment, one thing that stood out for me was finding out that Festival Director, Jim Simpson, was the first manager of Black Sabbath. Very interesting, because I was in the same class at Holte Grammar-Commercial School, Aston, with Sabbath's Terence 'Geezer' Butler. Not that Geezer would remember me, or want to, as I once hit him in the face (accidentally) with a stiff-leather school satchel, making his nose bleed. But, it's always nice for no-bodies like me to name-drop, isn't it? Name-dropping apart though, the festival was an amazingly-successful achievement, and one I definitely want to attend next year.

Click here to return to the homepage. Click here to return to the bloglist.

 

Comment Form

If you wish to comment, please use the form below.

Comments are moderated before publication.

Required fields are marked *
Please tick this box to prove that you are human *